Rendering the Riches: Turn Beef Fat (Suet) into Tallow

Rendering the Riches: Turn Beef Fat (Suet) into Tallow

Shelly Oswald

Waste not, want not when it's so easy to make tallow, a delicious high heat cooking fat, from a lump of beef fat (suet) and use up the forgotten bits of the harvest.

Why Grass-Fed Tallow?

Unlike their grain-fed counterparts, grass-fed cows offer a uniquely rich fat profile. The benefits of a pasture-based diet means higher levels of CLA: This fatty acid has been linked to health benefits like reducing inflammation and boosting immunity and is abundant in grass-fed fat.

A vitamin powerhouse: Get your daily dose of vitamins A, D, and K2 from this natural source.

Flavorful fat: Experience the distinct, earthy depth only grass-fed tallow can deliver to your pan.

 

From Suet to Tallow: Rendering

The good news is that transforming farm-fresh suet into culinary gold is easier than you think! Gather these simple tools:

* Slow cooker: This slow and steady approach yields perfect tallow. (If you don't have a slow cooker, a large pot will do)
* A fine-mesh strainer or cheesecloth to filter your fat.
* Clean jars or silicone molds like ice cubes, flowers, hearts, etc (the size of a pat of butter) that I find easy to grab from the fridge or freezer when cooking

Directions:

  1. Figure 1 pint of tallow per 1 lb suet
  2. Cut the suet into bite-size pieces or cubes and add to slow cooker (or pot)
  3. Turn slow cooker on low and let the fat slowly warm up and melt out of the suet. It can take 6-12 hours until the suet melts and leftover "cracklings" are crunchy.
  4. Strain the molten treasure into clean jars or molds, leaving the cracklings behind for a later snack (they're delicious!).
  5. Let the tallow cool entirely and solidify, ready to unleash its culinary magic 
  6. freeze or refrigerate to maintain freshness


Culinarily Yours: Embracing Tallow's Versatility

This farm-crafted fat isn't just for candles (although it makes amazing ones!). Tallow shines in the kitchen, boasting a high smoke point (around 420°F) ideal for:

Crispy potatoes to juicy steaks.  I use tallow in my pan-frying to add additional depths of flavor and texture.

Moist, flavorful roasts: I baste my roasts with butter or tallow for deep, rich, beefy flavor and to ward off dryness.

Beefy Stir Fry: add depth of flavor to stir fry or fried rice.



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